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Pantene Shows NFL Dads Doing Hair and It’s Adorable

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Last year, during Super Bowl week companies swung hard and heavy at dads, which was really cool. Pantene has struck an early chord showcasing NFL dads doing their daughters hair in a collection of cute short videos. The Pittsburg Steelers’ DeAngelo Williams, Dallas Cowboys’ Jason Witten and New Orleans Saints’ Benjamin Watson show a sweet Cool Dad side connecting with their princesses. Each dad tackles their kid’s hair in their own way and Pantene adds visual play-by-play that injects humor while staying on topic with hair products and football references. Brilliant!

#DadDo #DadsRule

Below are the videos that have been posted so far from cutest to cute, enjoy:

 

Fatherhood Friday with Joe Cool

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The 2015 NFL season has started and we kick off with a cool pic from Joe “Cool” Flacco, starting quarterback for the Baltimore Ravens and dad to three little ones under the age of 3 years old.

Happy Fatherhood Friday and NFL opening weekend.

Here is a video of Flacco talking about bringing his kids to practice:

Fatherhood Friday Still Strong

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This week, NFL player Devon Still got the amazing news that his 4-year old daughter, Leah, diagnosed with pediatric cancer, was now cancer free!  We salute young, strong and cool dad Still this Fatherhood Friday.

When he got the good news, he finally re-signed with the team that allowed him to stay on the practice squad with health insurance supporting his daughter’s struggle.  Still signed  a one-year deal with the Cincinnati Bengals..  He vowed not to play while his daughter fought cancer and now he plans to put attention towards the game and his daughter.

“I just felt numb,” Still said. “It was hard to believe especially with how bad the disease was spread throughout her body before. We were definitely hoping to hear that the treatment worked and tell us it digressed, but to say they didn’t see anything in her body the whole thing was shocking.”

 

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“When I look at my daughter all I can do is smile and hug her. It was not easy but every day, and every treatment, Leah fought like hell and kicked cancers butt! I’m so proud and blessed to call her my daughter. She has made an impact on me and on the world, at the age of four, that I can only wish to make in a lifetime.” -Devon Still

#DADSRULE #LeahSTRONG

Follow Devon on Instagram @man_of_still75

 

Shaking My Head “All Day” From One Dad to Another

I don’t know what to say about Minnesota Vikings All Pro, Adrian Peterson. He is on trial for child abuse and this week violated the terms of his bond by smoking marijuana before a mandatory drug test when admitted on court record to “smoking a little weed.”  His trial is not scheduled  until December 1, so it is likely that Peterson will not play again this season.  Prosecutors have filed to have Peterson re-arrested for the violation.

Peterson has fathered at least six children out of wedlock. Two of them were born to different mothers a month apart. Peterson lawyers say he will plead NOT guilty to felony child abuse charge for whipping his 4-year-old son with a switch (slender tree branch).

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Why not guilty? Peterson has admitted hitting the child, but contends it was intended as discipline, not to injure the child.

When Peterson’s son returned to his mother following a visit with the NFL running back, a check up at the doctor revealed the welts and authorities were alerted.  According to the boy,“Daddy Peterson hit me on my face” and threatened to punch him in the face if he reported what happened, the police station reported. The child also reportedly told his mother that Peterson “likes belts and switches” and “has a whooping room.”

I guess my problem is not with the action to discipline but the action of discipline. Before one gets to the excessive method of the punishment, at the core his son was too young.  Cognitively a 4-year old is still learing right from wrong and understanding things that it is up to his dad to help him understand.  The severity of force at such a young age causes more mental trauma than a child learning a lesson.  There are a variety of things that would hurt a child, even if a last resort spanking is the road chosen.

It is tough raising children, take it from a dad with multiples and there were times that I went a bit far but it was more to instill fear in my children, so that they know daddy might be a little crazy. Co-parenting is also a chore because one might be the stern parent and the other might not be and because you are not parenting in the same household the child may not always adjust to the changes in parenting.  As a parent you have to take that into account because it isn’t the child’s fault. Some patience and leniency have to be shown  toward teenagers, let alone a younger child with less grasp of the situation.

But even more, there is also a bit of common sense involved with parenting. Kids are more protected than we ever were when I was young. Spankings were everyday life and not random acts of abuse. It was common to see kids getting whippings in church, school and even in front of police officers. Not so today. Parents are getting locked up, embarrassed and terminated from jobs because of being accused of child abuse. Adrian Peterson didn’t get the memo and clearly he is not the sharpest pencil in the NFL supplies closet with his need to get high and further sabotage his case and career.

Peterson is on record saying that his dad would pull his pants down and stuff leaves in his mouth to keep him quiet while he spanked him. It’s said that this was discipline but as a dad we have to also break cycles.  Maybe this trial will help Peterson see that his dad was wrong and the cycle can be adjusted and broken.

 

Adrian Peterson and son On the Job

Screen Shot 2013-09-25 at 11.13.01 AMNFL All Star running back, Adrian Peterson and son sharing a moment at practice.

Work Hard, Father Harder!

#DadsRule All Day!

Fatherhood Friday Arian Foster

“When my daughter Zeniah arrived, I had a little ball of life staring at me. How could I teach her that hard work separates winning from losing when I leisurely procrastinated my way through life? How could I teach her to dream when I didn’t put everything I had into mine? How could I teach her to be a loving kind human spirit when at the time I was so bitter at life (I had just been passed on by every team in all seven rounds of the NFL draft) that my motto was ‘turn your back on the world and let them stab.’  Hypocrites don’t make good superheroes and that’s what parents are supposed to be … superheroes. So I vowed to unlearn what I thought to be truth and completely humble myself to this experience.” – Houston Texans NFL All-Star running back Arian Foster

Foster Daughter

#FatherhoodFriday is the new #FF

Here are Arian’s 6 Things he will teach his 4-year old princess, Zeniah:
1. Happiness. This is probably the most cliché virtue on the list, but the most pivotal to her success. She needs to understand that “success” is a voyage, not an “x” on a map. I believe strongly that smiles are contagious, so I fill my home with as much laughter as possible. I do this in hopes that this mindset bleeds into her heart. You can’t teach happiness, per se, but you can teach perspective and let her see that the situation she is born into is unique and the things she is accustomed to are not everyone’s reality. I grew up in some rough circumstances, but in a very honest and humble way, was content with what I did have because I knew there were others out there that had less than me. This leads into the next thing I need my princess to understand.

2. The value of a dollar. I remember sometimes taking sponge baths as a boy because the water had been turned off, or my mother crying and asking me to go to bed at dinnertime because there was no food. But the most vivid memories I have were things like when my dad let me wear his favorite hat on my 8th birthday while he taught me how to make perfect scrambled eggs (which I would challenge anyone to a cook-off with). Or when my parents wanted to spoil us, we’d go to Blockbuster to pick out a movie and have family movie night. Moments like those I will hold in my memory bank for as long as my blood pumper is pumping. So how do I teach the daughter of a millionaire what money even is? The best way I’ve found for now came up after she asked for a Dora the Explorer video game that cost $34. I explained to her as best I could that daddy and mommy work hard to get these things that we call dollars. If she wanted it, we’d get it for her, but she had to earn it. We told her she had to do “chores” and every time she completed a task we marked a tally on a piece of paper hanging on the fridge. When she got to 34 “chores”, we’d buy the Dora game. She was so excited, and so was I. She really understood and took to the concept of earning and the fact that one chore meant one step closer to getting that game.

3. Know your why. Any time anyone comes up to me with any kind of idea or business proposition, I always ask them “Why?” It seems simple, but it’s actually an intricate question. Nine times out of ten, if someone’s why is to make money, they’ll fail at what they are trying to do. Here’s why I believe this: “Successful” people are usually self-vindicated people. They don’t need pats on the back. They don’t need compliments. The merit of their work is endorsed by what they see in the mirror. They drive themselves until they are satisfied. People who are monetarily motivated often tire of their occupations and eventually lose focus. But if you are in love with what you do day in and day out, it’s not work. Every day you’re adding a piece of joy to your ethos. So find your passion, and fall in love with your why.

4. Kindness. It is a virtue that you must have if you are around me. Negative energy sucks the life out of people, and we’re here to smile! You must treat people kindly. No one is any better than you are and you are no better than anyone else. We are all doing the best we can to figure out this thing we call life, so humble yourself to the fact that you know very little. I’m no different. I know very little, but I do my best to learn. I’ve learned things from a man with a PhD, a man who lived under a bridge, and a child. Treat everyone with kindness. It goes a long way. I was taught that people will rarely remember what you tell them, but they will always remember how you made them feel. In that same breath I’ll let her know not to let people take advantage of her. Weak people prey on weak people. I’m not into the turning-the-other-cheek business. I firmly believe there are times when people must stand their ground. Pick your battles wisely, but don’t initiate any unwarranted hate.

5. Men and her worth. (loads shotgun) A sore subject for any man with a daughter. I will teach her that she is a young goddess. Help her understand her worth. Let her know that she must hold every man accountable for who they are and how they act towards her. There will be a day when I give her away, and they say that a woman spends her life looking for her father in her groom, so until that day I will try to be the example of a man that she eventually will seek out. Men tend to be motivated by one thing. Don’t fall victim to a prince charming. If he cares for her, he’ll act accordingly. If not (aims shotgun), well, I guess it just wasn’t meant to be.

6. The flying spaghetti monster. There are billions of people on Earth with hundreds of religions and sects that trickle off each other. I will never tell her what to believe in. I know parents are very influential on kids’ spiritual beliefs and that can be a positive or negative thing. I can give her a basic understanding of religions when she starts showing interest and asking questions. But I will remain silent otherwise. How can I make a young mind believe this is the truth for them when they don’t yet have the capacity nor the cognitive desire to delve into something like this? If she shows interest I would advise her to fully investigate a religion and see if it fits her. And if she chooses none of the above, I’ll be fine with that as well. The values I instill in her should guide her to her decision. What’s most important, I believe, is to support her decision no matter what.

Source: YAHOO Shine

#DADsRULE

 

 

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