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DaddysCool mentioned on Huffington Post

Our friend in fatherhood Zac Rosenberg posted the piece for his web site 8Bitdad.com,

25 Reasons Kids Should Be Left Alone With Their Dads

And it got picked up by Huffington Post.  Scroll down to number “6” and see my son Arin and I. Check out the piece it is a good quick read with lots of photos.  We stand united the mission is afoot … #DadsRule

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What Bieber Really Needs is a Dad

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The image of Justin Bieber bare-chested on the cover of Rolling Stone Magazine sent Huffington Post blogger Roland Warren into a poignant tirade about fatherhood or lack there of, in the Biebs case.  Warren gives excerpts from the article and his overall view of Bieber and how the lack of a dad is his life is the reason of his very public downward spiral.

“I have a special place in my heart for fatherless boys because I know well their lonely journey. A boy has a hole in his soul in the shape of his father. God whispers into the womb of his mother that there is a man who will love him like no other. But, if his father is unable or unwilling to fill this hole, it can leave a wound that is not easily healed.” – Roland Warren

Read more about  “The Hole in Justin Bieber’s Soul” 

Just Say No to Handheld Devices

girl-on-mobile-deviceHuffington Post blogger Cris Rowan has been kicking up dust calling for parents to ban all handheld devices in the kids 12 and under. It seems a bit extreme, but she does back up her argument with some stats from various studies. Personally, just like anything we allow our children to do, we must be the adults and set up the schedule. When it comes to electronics it really becomes a problem when parents allow these devises to babysit the kids in order to get more daddy or mommy time, or mommy and daddy time.  This hurts your child’s developement and ultimately your relationship with them.

Check out Rowan’s

10 Reasons Why Handheld Devices Should Be Banned for Children Under the Age of 12

1. Rapid brain growth
Between 0 and 2 years, infant’s brains triple in size, and continue in a state of rapid development to 21 years of age (Christakis 2011). Early brain development is determined by environmental stimuli, or lack thereof. Stimulation to a developing brain caused by overexposure to technologies (cell phones, internet, iPads, TV), has been shown to be associated with executive functioning and attention deficit, cognitive delays, impaired learning, increased impulsivity and decreased ability to self-regulate, e.g. tantrums (Small 2008, Pagini 2010).

2. Delayed Development
Technology use restricts movement, which can result in delayed development. One in three children now enter school developmentally delayed, negatively impacting literacy and academic achievement (HELP EDI Maps 2013). Movement enhances attention and learning ability (Ratey 2008). Use of technology under the age of 12 years is detrimental to child development and learning (Rowan 2010).

3. Epidemic Obesity
TV and video game use correlates with increased obesity (Tremblay 2005). Children who are allowed a device in their bedrooms have 30% increased incidence of obesity (Feng 2011). One in four Canadian, and one in three U.S. children are obese (Tremblay 2011). 30% of children with obesity will develop diabetes, and obese individuals are at higher risk for early stroke and heart attack, gravely shortening life expectancy (Center for Disease Control and Prevention 2010). Largely due to obesity, 21st century children may be the first generation many of whom will not outlive their parents (Professor Andrew Prentice, BBC News 2002).

4. Sleep Deprivation
60% of parents do not supervise their child’s technology usage, and 75% of children are allowed technology in their bedrooms (Kaiser Foundation 2010). 75% of children aged 9 and 10 years are sleep deprived to the extent that their grades are detrimentally impacted (Boston College 2012).

5. Mental Illness 
Technology overuse is implicated as a causal factor in rising rates of child depression, anxiety, attachment disorder, attention deficit, autism, bipolar disorder, psychosis and problematic child behavior (Bristol University 2010Mentzoni 2011Shin 2011,Liberatore 2011, Robinson 2008). One in six Canadian children have a diagnosed mental illness, many of whom are on dangerous psychotropic medication (Waddell 2007).

6. Aggression 
Violent media content can cause child aggression (Anderson, 2007). Young children are increasingly exposed to rising incidence of physical and sexual violence in today’s media. “Grand Theft Auto V” portrays explicit sex, murder, rape, torture and mutilation, as do many movies and TV shows. The U.S. has categorized media violence as a Public Health Risk due to causal impact on child aggression (Huesmann 2007). Media reports increased use of restraints and seclusion rooms with children who exhibit uncontrolled aggression.

7. Digital dementia
High speed media content can contribute to attention deficit, as well as decreased concentration and memory, due to the brain pruning neuronal tracks to the frontal cortex (Christakis 2004, Small 2008). Children who can’t pay attention can’t learn.

8. Addictions
As parents attach more and more to technology, they are detaching from their children. In the absence of parental attachment, detached children can attach to devices, which can result in addiction (Rowan 2010). One in 11 children aged 8-18 years are addicted to technology (Gentile 2009).

9. Radiation emission
In May of 2011, the World Health Organization classified cell phones (and other wireless devices) as a category 2B risk (possible carcinogen) due to radiation emission (WHO 2011). James McNamee with Health Canada in October of 2011 issued a cautionary warning stating “Children are more sensitive to a variety of agents than adults as their brains and immune systems are still developing, so you can’t say the risk would be equal for a small adult as for a child.” (Globe and Mail 2011). In December, 2013 Dr. Anthony Miller from the University of Toronto’s School of Public Health recommend that based on new research, radio frequency exposure should be reclassified as a 2A (probable carcinogen), not a 2B (possible carcinogen). American Academy of Pediatrics requested review of EMF radiation emissions from technology devices, citing three reasons regarding impact on children (AAP 2013).

10. Unsustainable
The ways in which children are raised and educated with technology are no longer sustainable (Rowan 2010). Children are our future, but there is no future for children who overuse technology. A team-based approach is necessary and urgent in order to reduce the use of technology by children. Please reference below slide shows onwww.zonein.ca under “videos” to share with others who are concerned about technology overuse by children.

 READ the ENTIRE ARTICLE

25 Things Daughters Wish Daddy Knew

A funny thing happened to Tara Hedman, a mental health counselor, as she sat in an auto repair shop watching a daddy play with his daughter.  She began tofather_daughter think about what that time meant to that young child.  What would that little girl say if she could lay out all the questions and give her dad a road map of what to do and say?  Hedman wrote a blog about it on Huffington Post and this is what she came up with …

“So, to all the daddies with little girls who aren’t old enough yet to ask for what they need from you, here is what we wish you knew:

1. How you love me is how I will love myself.

2. Ask how I am feeling and listen to my answer, I need to know you value me before I can understand my true value.

3. I learn how I should be treated by how you treat my mom, whether you are married to her or not.

4. If you are angry with me, I feel it even if I don’t understand it, so talk to me.

5. Every time you show grace to me or someone else, I learn to trust God a little more.

6. I need to experience your nurturing physical strength, so I learn to trust the physicality of men.

7. Please don’t talk about sex like a teenage boy, or I think it’s something dirty.

8. When your tone is gentle, I understand what you are saying much better.

9. How you talk about female bodies when you’re “just joking” is what I believe about my own.

10. How you handle my heart, is how I will allow it to be handled by others.

11. If you encourage me to find what brings joy, I will always seek it.

12. If you teach me what safe feels like when I’m with you, I will know better how to guard myself from men who are not.

13. Teach me a love of art, science, and nature, and I will learn that intellect matters more than dress size.

14. Let me say exactly what I want even if it’s wrong or silly, because I need to know having a strong voice is acceptable to you.

15. When I get older, if you seem afraid of my changing body, I will believe something is wrong with it.

16. If you understand contentment for yourself, so will I.

17. When I ask you to let go, please remain available; I will always come back and need you if you do.

18. If you demonstrate tenderness, I learn to embrace my own vulnerability rather than fear it.

19. When you let me help fix the car and paint the house, I will believe I can do anything a boy can do.

20. When you protect my femininity, I learn everything about me is worthy of protecting.

21. How you treat our dog when you think I’m not watching tells me more about you than does just about anything else.

22. Don’t let money be everything, or I learn not to respect it or you.

23. Hug, hold, and kiss me in all the ways a daddy does that are right and good and pure. I need it so much to understand healthy touch.

24. Please don’t lie, because I believe what you say.

25. Don’t avoid hard conversations, because it makes me believe I’m not worth fighting for.”

Good to hear a daughter’s perspective. Read the full blog on HuffPost >># DadsRule

Father of Kevin Durant Foul On The Play

 

I came across an interesting article on Washington Post about Kevin Durant and his estranged father who abandoned Durant and his family when the Olympian/NBA All Star was one years old. I  know all to well about being abandoned around that age by an unfit mother, in my case. Read this Huffington Post article by my mom.

Here is an excerpt from the Washington Post piece by Matt Breen on Durant:

Last month, before the U.S. basketball team played an exhibition at Verizon Center, (Wayne) Pratt and Durant got together for lunch in Washington. As Durant took his time to accommodate the inevitable autograph seekers, Pratt stepped aside and marveled at his son.

“It’s never too late to be your kid’s father; it’s never too late,” Pratt said. “You have to try, we all make mistakes. But, you have to get back in there and fight. These young men really need us.” READ MORE

 

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